Coming of Age Day in Japan 成人の日

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In Japan, the second Monday of January marks the Coming of Age Day or Seijin no Hi 成人の日. On this day, anyone who turns 20 between April 1st of the previous year (2016) and April 1st of the current year (2017) officially becomes an adult in the eyes of Japanese society.

In addition to the new adults being able to vote, smoke, and drink in Japan, each ward holds a ceremony called seijin-shiki 成人式 to officially introduce the newly minted adults. Women wear special kimono with long sleeves, called furisode, and often with fur trim since it’s still winter. These are usually rented because they are quite expensive. Men can wear hakata, or traditional baggy pants, but most often they wear suits with ties.

Usually friends gather after the ceremony and celebrate at an izakaya or Japanese pub, at karaoke, or even in parks (but usually it’s pretty cold for this). Even if they haven’t officially reached 20 on the day of the ceremony, Japanese izakaya won’t card on this day.

Many new adults go to the shrine after the ceremony, to offer prayers for their future. Since the Coming of Age Day is close to the New Year, many people are still making their first trips to the shrines and it can be quite crowded!

Hasedera Temple, Kamakura

In recent years, participation in the Coming of Age Day ceremonies has declined. Some people say that not as many people are participating as they used to, and some people say that there just aren’t as many young people are there used to be (the aging society problem of Japan). While I don’t know the reason why participation is down, I know that my friends – in past years as well as this year – are very eager to participate!

What kind of celebrations does your country have for coming of age? Let me know in the comments!